Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

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Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

Empty
I am coming to believe that I am a sociopath. Lack of empathy, remorse, etc. I also display many less important symptoms associated with sociopathy, such as low impulse control and low tolerance for distress. I have quit many jobs after very short periods of time because I went in convinced that I was so talented in whatever genre of work was involved that it would not be unpleasant. Once I discovered that I was not as talented as I thought, and that I would actually have to experience displeasure as part of the job, I would quit.

I don't believe that these are common characteristics of sociopaths; I believe that these are common characteristics of sociopaths who get caught, and consequently diagnosed and studied.

I don't care if you think I'm weak, inferior, etc. I know. Tell me, if it gives you pleasure. It doesn't matter to me.

Otherwise, I would really like to hear techniques for increasing distress tolerance, patience, and impulse control. I would obviously prefer if the techniques are something other than blatant exposure therapy, but if that's all you've got, tell me how you did it.
Kao
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Re: Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

Kao
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Re: Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

Empty
I am basically terrified of negative psychological sensations. I routinely avoid situations in which I will experience mental pain (mostly mundane tasks) even if I can understand how they will improve my life in the future. I can't (or, more accurately, won't) hold a job once I experience the discomfort that it inflicts. I would, given a reliable means, gladly commit suicide before enduring boring or uncomfortable activities or situations for long periods of time.

Come to think of it, though, I don't think impulse control is as much a problem now as it has been in the past. I used to have a relatively serious drug problem, but after experiencing the displeasures of the associated lifestyle I have had little trouble not getting high. I guess distress tolerance is the bigger issue.
Kao
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Kao
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Empty
It often has to do with how I think I'm being perceived, but not always. I identify that as a fairly classic case of social anxiety. I am in the process of reframing my previous understanding of the idea within a sociopathic context, and it seems to make more sense; I am overly conscious of the possibility that I will offend, hurt, or otherwise present myself distastefully to others, and as such render them useless or counterproductive to me. The actual sensation, however, feels similar in me to the way it's described by authorities on the subject. That, however, I am actually getting better at dealing with. Even so, I'll take your advice on redesigning my expressed personality.

I'll also take your advice on making others do routine tasks, or working on that. I'm pretty good with people I know (i.e. family), but the social anxiety I described above makes it difficult to impose my will on others. If it were simply a matter of working through the anxiety mentally, I expect I would learn quickly. However, I am as afraid of the physiological reaction anxiety gives me, and the subsequent impression I might leave on others in such a scenario, as the actual potential negative consequences.
Kao
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Kao
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Re: Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

FlawedDiamond
In reply to this post by Empty
Boredom for me is the killer.. the phrase 'idle hands..." it's true. When I am bored I am at my most impulsive, most scheming, most loathing.. not that these thoughts don't happen anyway, but its like brushing your teeth and robbing a bank in your head.. your gonna fantasize about these things anyway but when you have the time and opportunity to plan them...

I suggest u Keep busy.. you seem intelligent enough to understand certain behavior isn't socially accepted and isnt beneficial to your end result, whatever it may be at any given moment.. so find thing to focus your attention on that will
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Re: Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

chrisbo347
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"Otherwise, I would really like to hear techniques for increasing distress tolerance, patience, and impulse control."

if you can self-analyze this much and want to change your habits you aren't a sociopath
At the end of our conversation she turned to address you, the
reader. She said if you’re beginning to feel worried that you may be a psychopath, if you recognize some of those traits in yourself, if you’re feeling a creeping anxiety about it, that means you are not one.
The Psychology Test by Jon Ronson

you aren't sociopaths..you are naive and confused
Kao
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Kao
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Re: Any sociopaths have experience improving impulse control and distress tolerance?

Oh, You Know
This post was updated on .
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@topic  I know this has already been said by Flawed, but both of those problems can be cured by staying busy. Bad impulsive decisions are often triggered by distress. With socios, boredom is often the leading cause of stress.  Stay busy but not too busy (as being overloaded is another stresser), and think "happy thoughts."  When I got a job so I could spend time with my semi-long distant girlfriend (another city, same state) before she went into Service, I pulled through by working my ass off.  It was construction, and when the (predominately older) crew would go on break, I'd torment them about "going soft" in their old age so we could get back to work.  While working I just kept thinking about WHY I was doing it; for some long overdue one-on-one with my prize.  And, although I ultimately quit the job and burned the money on partying my ass off for a few days straight, I actually ENJOYED work while I was there.

@Kao I don't really have anything to add as it is all well explained. I just wanted to say you are giving so much great advice.

@chrisbo347 Although I suspect your conclusion is correct, you are most certainly wrong about the process that gave you that conclusion.  I am, without a doubt, a sociopath and I frequently self-analyze.  My desire to know everything and need to know the full depth of the human mind makes self-analyzing not just useful, but critical.  Socios think without that messy and cumbersome layer of emotions that norms/empaths use (or should I say, are used by).  Instead, we predominately rely on the very core instincts; survival and self satisfaction.  So, by studying one self (as a sociopath), you get a better understanding of how the "top layer" of norms works in conjunction with the "bottom layer" of humans in general.  An understanding of this balance makes manipulation and control of victims much easier, something truly high functioning sociopath are aware of.

Really, it seems more narcissistic than sociopathic to avoid all self-analysis.  True socios know that all knowledge can be used for their benefit.. it's why HFS are generally so well educated.

I believe Kao and I are in agreement here, despite our slightly different approach to self-analysis (although it should be noted that mine too was over an extended period of time, and in small doses).  Only a low functioning sociopath would believe there is nothing to learn from looking within.
My father said he knew I was a bit off ever since he took me to see Jaws as a kid, and I rooted for the shark.